How to Apply

Questions about admissions?

See our Frequently Asked Questions below, or email chegrads@engineering.ucsb.edu

UCSB Graduate Division

graddiv.ucsb.edu
3117 Cheadle Hall
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-2070
(805) 893-2277

Graduate Program Application Process

Students seeking admission to graduate status at the University of California must hold a bachelor's degree or its equivalent from an institution of acceptable standing. The program of preparation should be substantially the same, both in the distribution of academic subject matter and in scholarship achievement, as the requirements for a comparable degree at the University of California.

Applicants for admission are evaluated by the prospective major department and the graduate dean in terms of their scholastic qualifications and their preparation for the proposed field of study.

The graduate dean makes the final decision, guided by the recommendation of the major department. The dean may deny admission if the applicant's scholastic record is undistinguished, if preparation is judged inadequate as a foundation for advanced study, or if the department's facilities are already filled to capacity. If the undergraduate background of an otherwise qualified applicant is found to be somewhat deficient in fundamental training, the student may be admitted with the provision that certain specified undergraduate courses be completed. No credit toward an advanced degree will be allowed for such courses.

Please note: The Chemical Engineering Department ONLY accepts applications for Fall Quarter.

Deadline for Fall Quarter 2017

The deadline for all applications is December 15, 2016.

Application Process

  • Apply via the web: https://www.graddiv.ucsb.edu/eapp/Login.aspx
  • Please note:
    • The minimum cumulative GPA for all applicants is 3.0.
    • The Graduate Record Examination (General Test only) is required of all applicants
    • The Chemical Engineering Department ONLY accepts applications for the Fall Quarter.

Admissions Committee

The admissions decision is based on a comprehensive assessment of the applicant's intellectual potential and promise, involving a review of the following criteria:

  1. Applicant's undergraduate education and records (and MS education and record, if applicable)
  2. Past research experience
  3. Research interests formulated by the applicant and their programmatic fit with existing research areas in the department
  4. Letters of support from (preferrably faculty) references
  5. Standardized test scores

Financial Support

All students admitted into our Ph.D. program are guaranteed financial support that is continued throughout their studies as long as they remain in good academic standing. This includes fellowships, grants, teaching assistantships (TAs), and graduate research assistantships (GSRs). 

Frequently Asked Questions

Do you accept applications for Winter or Spring quarters?

No, applications are only accepted for Fall quarter.

Should I contact faculty regarding openings in their research groups?

No, graduate students are admitted to our department and not to specific research groups. Students go through an extensive research advisor selection process during their first quarter of residence, submit their top choices after meeting with prospective advisors of interest, and are assigned to an advisor at the end of Fall Quarter.

Is a preliminary application required?

No

Does your department have a rolling application process?

No

Are the GRE/TOEFL exams required and, if so, is a subject area required for the GRE?

Yes, the GRE general exam is required for students applying to all graduate programs at UCSB, including chemical engineering.  Subject area exams, however, are not required for chemical engineering.  The TOEFL or IELTS exams are required for all International students whose native language is not English. The only exception is granted to those who have completed a degree program in the United States.

What is the minimum score for the GRE and TOEFL?

There is no minimum GRE test score requirement.

International students whose native language is not English must pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). The minimum test scores required for admission to Chemical Engineering are:

TOEFL: 560 (paper), 83 (Internet)
IELTS: 7 (Overall Band Score)

What are the institution and department codes for ETS (Educational Testing Service) to send GRE/TOEFL scores?

UCSB’s Institution code is 4835. A department code is not required. Exam scores are sent electronically from ETS to the Graduate Division. Departments no longer receive test scores directly.

Can I get financial support?

All students admitted into our Ph.D. program are guaranteed financial support. This support is guaranteed for as long as they remain in good academic standing with the department and university and are making satisfactory progress towards completing their degree requirements. Financial support comes in the form of a stipend and/or a combination of teaching and researcher appointments, plus payment of fees, non-resident tuition (if applicable) and health insurance. NOTE: Non-resident tuition will be paid for US non-residents for one year. Residency for fee purposes must be established prior to the beginning of the second year of residence.

Is my GPA high enough to apply? Are my GRE scores good enough?

The graduate admissions committee makes decisions based on a comprehensive assessment of an applicant’s portfolio of grades, test scores, research experience, statement of purpose, and letters of recommendation. However, the admissions process is extremely competitive, and successful applicants typically have GPAs that are appreciably above 3.5 on a 4.0 scale.

My undergraduate degree is in an area other than chemical engineering.  Do  I have a chance of being admitted?

All of our graduate students must demonstrate competency in four core areas of chemical engineering through coursework in their first year of study: Applied Math, Kinetics and Reaction Engineering, Thermodynamics, and Transport Phenomena.  While we have admitted students with a non-chemical engineering background in the past, such applicants must be able to pass the core requirements and typically the admissions committee seeks evidence in the application portfolio (e.g., transcript, research experience, statement) of adequate preparation for this coursework.

Do you accept applicants seeking a terminal M.S. degree?

Because our graduate program is focused on doctoral education, we do not admit students seeking a terminal M.S. degree.

What should I write in my statement of purpose?

Please elaborate on your educational and career ambitions, your technical preparation, any honors or distinctions, and your research interests as they relate to UCSB.  It is particularly useful to discuss research experiences; for each we encourage you to describe not only your contributions, but also the nature of the problem, its importance within the scientific community, and the interpretation and significance of your results.  We also are interested to hear about: research publications or manuscripts in preparation (include full references), research presentations (poster or oral), advanced coursework (especially graduate courses), major awards or scholarships, involvement in professional or scientific organizations, and involvement in educational or outreach activities.

Please AVOID autobiographic and creative writing, instead using a professional tone of the kind expected for a job application.  For example, statements that begin with your early childhood inspirations ("I have always loved science since I received my first Lego set"), that begin in medias res ("It was close to the end of the Chem-E Car competition, and we were certain we would fail."), or that pontificate ("I have always aspired to live by this quote from Einstein.") are generally frowned upon and will not help the admission committee's impression of your application.   Instead, begin your application with a direct statement of your interests and motivation for graduate study

From whom should I secure letters of reference?

We advise you to secure as many of your letters as possible from tenure-track faculty, either at your home institution or at other institutions in which you have been, e.g., a summer research intern.  Letters from supervisors at industrial internships or jobs are generally less informative, and you should include at most one, if any.   As a courtesy to your references, we encourage you to give them at least two weeks notice, if not more, given the high demands for letters during the graduate application period.